Tires, Tubes, Thorn Proofing

What's the cost?

We offer a range of options to reduce your chances of a puncture from road hazards. HomeTubesTiresThere is no" one size" fit and we work with our clients to determine the combination of tire style, tube, sealant, and protective inner linear to meet their desired tradeoff between overall wheel weight and puncture resistance.

Single wheel prices range from $23 for an installed standard tube to $84 for a full puncture resistant protection service that includes a new tube with sealant, a heavy duty puncture resistant liner, and a new tire (price can vary for specialty tires and brand).

Our Full Bike Puncture Resistant Package provides a 20% discount over separately purchased services. This package includes 2 tires, 2 tubes with sealant, and 2 heavy duty liners for $139.

WHY Purchase our puncture-resistance product?

•    Flats are part of cycling and are inconvenient.
•    A blowout can be dangerous -- reducing their likelihood is a safer way to ride.
•    Bikes that are prone to punctures tend to sit in garages and collect dust. This is just sad ☹

General information on puncture protectionGoat

There are two types of cyclists in the Tri-Cities; those who have had a flat from “goatheads” and those who will.  Goatheads are attracted to area newcomers and have brought many an unsuspecting tire to its rim.  Technically, goatheads are a seed product of the Tribulus terrestris [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tribulus_terrestris] or sometimes referred to as the puncture vine plant.  They are produced during the flowering summer months and once released are easily scattered by the mid-Columbia winds.  Goatheads are robust and many survive weathering over the course of the seasons.  (See our “helpful hints” about how to handle a goathead attack!) In addition to goatheads, all riders eventually pickup some small sharp objects that can result in a flat. 

Be aware that puncture resistant measures rarely prevent a blowout that can occur when encountering a large or particularly sharp object.  Always scan the road for debris.  Even if the debris itself lookTirePuncturess harmless, it can be a clue to other road hazards in the area.  I was once riding along and noticed a part of a roofing shingle in my path. You guessed it – 25 yards down the road I started seeing roofing nails :-O. 

Contact Information

Mike Watkins
c. 509.392.1458
e: roundaboutcycling@gmail.com
w. roundaboutcycling.com